Dev

The Developers focus their efforts on ‘pushing out code.’ Changes and enhancements to production systems and attendant failures in providing service are seen as part of this rush to get the latest and greatest code out to consumers.

Ops

The Operations groups, on the other hand, are “reactive.” They are focused on service management and incident response. Teams supporting operations tend to use organization models closely aligned with ITSM and ITIL.

How DevOps Works

Under a DevOps model, development and operations teams are no longer “siloed.” Sometimes, these two teams are merged into a single team where the engineers work across the entire application lifecycle, from development and test to deployment to operations, and develop a range of skills not limited to a single function.

In some DevOps models, quality assurance and security teams may also become more tightly integrated with development and operations and throughout the application lifecycle. When security is the focus of everyone on a DevOps team, this is sometimes referred to as DevSecOps.

Continuous Integration

Continuous integration is a software development practice where developers regularly merge their code changes into a central repository, after which automated builds and tests are run. The key goals of continuous integration are to find and fix bugs faster, improve software quality, and reduce the time it takes for new updates

Continuous Delivery

Continuous delivery is a software development practice where code changes are automatically built, tested, and prepared for a release to production. It expands upon continuous integration by deploying all code changes to a testing environment and/or a production environment after the build stage.